Two ways to simulate the exhaustion of a half marathon

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half marathon advice

Running a half marathon means a significant effort for your body and, for that reason, it is necessary to be ready in order to deal with exhaustion that implies running 13.1 miles.

The workouts that are part of your training plan will allow you to run the 13.1 miles and enjoy the race or suffer a true torture (especially during the last miles).

In order to be ready to face tiredness you will feel in your legs during the last miles of a half marathon, it is important to try to simulate the tiredness felt while running in these conditions.

As a result, we will now show you two ways of simulating tiredness during the last miles of a 13.1-mile race.

SIMULATING THE EXHAUSTION OF A 13.1-MILE RACE

To attain this, we will use a concept known as “accumulated fatigue”, which consists in transferring fatigue from one training to the next one.

To simulate the exhaustion in a 13.1-mile race, you will use your weekly long run (the longest training of the week) and the purpose is to start training with your legs tired from a previous training.

Even though the accumulated fatigue effect can be attained in different ways, we will now give you two effective tips to simulate exhaustion during the last miles:

Exhausts your legs

To accumulate fatigue you need to train your *legs hard a bit before your long runs.

The best thing to do is to attend a gym (though exercising yourself at home could help) and to create a tough weight lifting routine to exercise your legs before your long runs.

Your routine should take about 40/50 minutes during which you will use the main muscle groups of your legs with exercises such as squats, press, strides, etc.

After training at the gym, *you should have your long run with your legs tired (you can reduce it up to 20%).


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Workout hard previously

Another option to run with tired legs (as in the last miles of the half marathon) is to have your weekly long run the day after a tough training.

Then, for example, you can have a 10 kilometers training at a race pace (the pace you would like to run the 13.1 race) the day before your long run.

The following day you should feel your legs tired and during your long run, this exhaustion will grow.

DO NOT EMPLOY THESE TECHNIQUES IF YOU ARE NOT USED TO TOUGH TRAINING. AVOID USING THESE TECHNIQUES EVERY WEEK.


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Photo by Peter Mooney http://flickr.com/photos/peterm7/16658416908 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-SA) license